Structure: Aim and Hypothesis

If you have been keeping good laboratory notes you will already have kept a record of your aims and, if appropriate, your hypothesis(es). In other words, you will already have enough information to write that stage of the introduction. Typically, your introduction will lead up to a statement of your aim and/or hypothesis.

In your lab notes, you write your aim as a phrase: - to overexpress a cloned gene - the divIB Fusion Gene - in E. coli, and analyse the products to demonstrate the presence of the fusion protein of expected size.
When you write the introduction to your lab report, you need to change this to a sentence: This experiment was carried out to overexpress a cloned gene - the divIB Fusion Gene - in E. coli, and analyse the products to demonstrate the presence of the fusion protein of expected size.
You can also write an introduction which contains both an aim and an hypothesis:

This experiment aims to show overexpression of the DivIB fusion protein in E. coli transformants incubated in a growth medium and then induced.

Induced samples were expected to show a band in the SDS-PAGE gel that increases in strength at longer induction times.

Note that the hypothesis and aim are typically (but not always) expressed in the PAST TENSE: The hypothesis was that ....
Induced samples were expected ....
But a hypothesis also contains language for ‘guessing’ or ‘predicting’ the experimental outcomes. The hypothesis was that induced samples would ..........
Induced samples were expected ..........
» Screen 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 Next